Celebrating Nowruz with Our Writers

Editor’s note: Our writers in Kabul tell some of the ways they will celebrate Nowruz with their families on Tuesday, March 20th: Afghanistan’s New Year and the first day of spring.

Nowruz means a new day and for the coming of Nowruz we have to make ready our homes, the streets, and every corner. The thoughts, the clothes, everything is about becoming new. The gift of Nowruz is smiling and happiness. —Fatima Hu

We are making haft mewa—seven fruits—and we’ll go together with ten families to green places. —Zahra

We sit down with haft mewa on the tablecloth, make a wish, and then we go outdoors to have fun. But there is a traditional belief that on the last day of Nowruz—Sizdah Bedar—if you go outside it will bring misfortune the rest of the year. —Fatima H.

We celebrate with orange flowers in Nangarhar. —Seema

We make haft mewa and eat this sweet dish with seven kinds of fruit with the whole family. We go to the Naranj Gul Mela festival, which means Festival of Orange Flowers, in Nangarhar. —Hila

We celebrate by making wishes for ourselves and for others.  —Fatima Ha

Everyone makes something new—clothes or food. We make haft mewa and seven dishes that start with the letter S. We go to relatives’ houses and our family goes for a picnic in Mazar-e-Sharif or Kapisa. Having Nowruz once a year makes me happier than ever. —Basirah

Photo by Tina Singleton


Comments

  1. Each description is simple, yet filled with an intense imagery of the promise of new hope in a new year–almost like haiku simplicity. The writings effectively portray the Nowruz traditions and the spirti of happiness that accompany them–a beautiful sharing of Afghan culture that all people can appreciate. I would love to see the seven fruits identifed in the photo–apricots, dates, grapes___?
    Thanks,

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