A House Divided

I feel ashamed
when I sit at the dining table eating for more than an hour until I am full, but my country’s children from morning to dark night hunt for food in the dirty garbage.

I feel ashamed
when I ride in comfortable cars that make dust as they pass, while intelligent but poor people go to a bus station, get the runaround, wait for hours, and then walk along the edges of war-damaged streets.

I feel ashamed
when I earn a big monthly salary without sweat or hard work, but others wake up early to make a little money working until sunset.

I feel ashamed—
I work in a building with modern equipment, electricity, Internet, but our needy workers stand on curbs, during the sunlight-warm days of summer and cold days of winter, waiting for hours to find daily wage work.

I feel ashamed
when I sleep in a soft, new, clean bed, while my common compatriots do not even have a pillow to rest on.

I feel ashamed
when I see farmers do hard work without basic equipment for years, but their season’s crops go to waste because of distant markets, damaged roads, and transportation expenses.

I feel ashamed
when I hear about our countrymen affected by HIV/AIDS who can’t get good care because of expired, bad-quality medicine and greedy doctors who cheat their patients.

I feel ashamed
when I say I support civil rights, but when I see civil rights abuses I do not stand with the victims and even stand against them.

I feel ashamed
when I realize I have a huge fortune that I don’t share with needy people who are so much less lucky than I.

I feel ashamed
when I see I am a human being, but I can’t see anything like humanity in myself.

By Mina T.

Photo: Afghan children sort bricks at the Sadat Ltd. Brick factory, where they work from 8am to 5 pm daily, on May 14, 2010 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Child labor is common at the brick factories where the parents work as laborers and, desperate to make more money, enlist their children to help do the easier jobs. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images.


Comments

  1. Kathlene Postma says:

    Mina,

    Every stanza in this poem speaks to me. Thank you for writing it.

  2. Thanks Kathlene, Amost the times I need to Cry and Pray to be solve Afghanistan people problems.

    • Kathlene Postma says:

      Don’t give up, Mina. Your courage is amazing. You are already using your voice to help others.

  3. Richelle says:

    Mina,

    By writing this poem, you are creating awareness of the plight of the less fortunate, and that’s something of which you can be proud.

    Richelle

  4. thanks a lot all of you I will encourage for more.

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