Wicked Witch

dorothy and the wicked witch of the west

I dreamt of a witch last night
She was like witches in stories—
ugly, with a black dress,
as black as darkness.

She looked evil, just like I’ve heard.
But then, something special happened—
I saw a light inside her heart
and heard her heart’s voice,
and it was sad, very sad
and she was tired, very tired,
her heart was broken by people.

Once she believed in justice:
if a man and woman made a mistake together,
why should only the woman suffer?
She asked for love,
She asked why people didn’t give smiles as gifts,  
and she asked for freedom,
as free as a dandelion.

She wanted to respect and to be respected;
that was all she asked,
but people of the village learned to be cruel;
they couldn’t smile because they didn’t know how,
and men were the decision makers,
and of course, they loved power,
loved someone to control,
and no one better than a woman!

They couldn’t understand her;
they didn’t listen to her;
they judged her, abandoned her;
they believed she was evil because she was different.
They made her ugly with their bad thoughts
and gifted her darkness.

No one tried to see
her inner beauty;
no one saw her differently,
so they made her into a witch,
the dark witch for children’s stories—
witch to be hated for difference,
but still, she kept the light
inside her.

By Masooma

Judy Garland and Martha Hamilton in MGM’s The Wizard of Oz.


Comments

  1. Brava, Masooma! So much truth here. So much wisdom. As a society, we are surrounded by people we’ve made wicked by our own cruelty and selfishness. You make it so plain here. I especially appreciated these stanzas:

    “She wanted to respect and to be respected;
    that was all she asked,
    but people of the village learned to be cruel;
    they couldn’t smile because they didn’t know how,
    and men were the decision makers,
    and of course, they loved power,
    loved someone to control,
    and no one better than a woman!

    They couldn’t understand her;
    they didn’t listen to her;
    they judged her, abandoned her;
    they believed she was evil because she was different.
    They made her ugly with their bad thoughts
    and gifted her darkness.”

    Fantastic poem, Masooma. Well done.

    Stacy

  2. Dear Masooma,
    This is truly one of the most remarkable poems I have ever read. It is simply incredible. I will reread this many, many times. Thank you so much for writing it and sharing it.
    Jeannie

  3. Wonderful and very insightful poem, Masooma and also very true. You have shown through this poem that you can empathize with the witch and understand her suffering. You are very much aware of how a person is treated by others when they look or act differently. Sadly, this tends to happen a lot; people can be cruel and act in a very scornful way towards those who do not conform.
    I completely agree with you that when both men and women make a mistake, it is usually the woman who suffers the most.
    Thank you for having written such a beautiful poem!

  4. Dearest Masooma,
    This wonderful poem shows once again that you are a gifted writer, an empathetic woman and a very insightful thinker. You have a deep understanding of why some people are cruel and what it can do to the victims of their cruelty. I know that light shines in your heart, too.
    Warmly,
    Jill

  5. Dear Masooma,
    Your poem eloquently reminds us of our double challenge: to keep the light inside us, and to see the light in others.
    Thank you for writing it.
    Gabrielle

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